When you file a lawsuit against a person or a company, you will probably be asked to provide documents that help prove your case. In the event of a non-subscriber, personal injury, or third-party lawsuit, one of the types of documents you might be asked to provide our office is a compilation of your paycheck stubs. While it’s not always easy or convenient to print copies of your paycheck stubs, it’s incredibly helpful to your case to provide them. 

      Paycheck stubs are used in a work injury lawsuit in a number of ways. In order to accurately assess your lost wages and lost wage-earning capacity to get a true amount of your damages, paychecks are almost necessary. While it is possible to come up with an estimate of how much you were earning prior to your incident and afterwards, it’s beneficial to show the opposing side proof of your income.

      Additionally, paycheck stubs provide a lot more information than just your hourly or weekly earnings. They also have valuable information regarding any paid-time off (PTO) or sick leave that you might have used in order to treat for your injuries sustained in the incident or because you were too injured to work. A loss of benefits such as these can also be used in assessing your damages.

       It’s almost impossible to remember the details of lost pay and benefits after a serious injury. Keeping your paychecks is a good way to document those losses you’ve incurred as a result of your injuries. While it’s not always easy or convenient to print copies of your paycheck stubs, it’s incredibly helpful to your case to provide them.

      By providing paychecks to your attorney at the outset of filing your case and as litigation on your case continues, you are actively helping ensure that underestimations are not being made when calculating your damages. You might be significantly underestimating how much you were earning. This can add up to significant money that isn’t being assessed. You could also end up overestimating how much income you were receiving, which would cast a doubtful glance on the good-faithfulness of your claims in the jury’s eyes.